Mastering MONTAGE: Lessons from a Master

Mastering MONTAGE: Lessons from a Master
The MONTAGE synthesizer is an amazing instrument from - producing EDM to designing specific sounds for a film – or as a creative outlet for your audio dreams. It is also a powerful piece of music technology which requires some practice and guidance to leverage fully its capabilities. To help you make the most of your MONTAGE, Yamaha's own Bad Mister has provided the deep diving "Mastering MONTAGE" series. If you have not had an opportunity to learn from this master musician and synthesizer guru, check out his recently completed 14-part series.
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9570 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE: Performance Basics and the Live Set II

Mastering MONTAGE: Performance Basics and the Live Set II
In the first installment of this series, we discussed several different configurations of PERFORMANCES for your MONTAGE. Here you will use what you learned (and created!) to take a closer look at putting together your own LIVE SETs. A Live Set is designed to give you access to your MONTAGE configurations when you are performing, thus the name, LIVE SET. Let's get started . . . 
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7001 Hits

Performance Basics and the Live Set 1

Performance Basics and the Live Set 1
We are kicking off this "Snorkel Level" series (for all MONTAGE users regardless of experience level) with the creative use of Performances and Live Sets.

There are some 2143 Preset Performances in MONTAGE. The USER area can store 640 of your own Performances. A set of 640 Performances can be placed in a Library. There can be eight Libraries - each containing as many as 640 Performances - resident on your MONTAGE. So let's get started!
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8066 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 13: Assign Switches 1 & 2

Mastering MONTAGE 13: Assign Switches 1 & 2
Bad Mister wraps up this "deep dive" into the functionality of the MONTAGE with lucky lesson #13.
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5892 Hits

Greg Spero, Halsey's Keyboardist and Sound Designer, Praises Yamaha Montage

Greg Spero, Halsey's Keyboardist and Sound Designer, Praises Yamaha Montage
With an expressive touch, keen awareness of melody and remarkable technique, Greg Spero is a talented pianist and keyboardist. He has performed with a diverse range of musicians, including: Arturo Sandoval; Corey Wilkes; and, former Miles Davis collaborator and music director, Robert Irving III. Additionally, he has co-produced tracks with producer Ski Beatz (Jay Z), and, Shock G (Digital Underground) - and is currently the keyboardist and sound designer for Halsey. Greg recently had a chance to experience Montage and was very impressed.
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12206 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE: Getting Started with Cubase

Mastering MONTAGE: Getting Started with Cubase
This begins a new "how-to" mini-series from Bad Mister to help you get the most from your MONTAGE. Learn more here about MONTAGE and Cubase.
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18975 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE: Getting Started

Mastering MONTAGE: Getting Started
Just got your new MONTAGE? You're new to synthesizers? Or you're an old hand at synthesizers, even owned a Motif? Here are some quick suggestions on what to do first...
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25917 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 12: Motion Sequence

Mastering MONTAGE 12: Motion Sequence
Motion Sequences are tempo-synchronized, completely customizable control sequences which can be assigned to virtually any synthesizer parameter - and provide incredibly creative new ways of programming sound. In this lesson from our own Bad Mister, learn more about how the Motion Sequence dedicated controls on the front panel make it easy to manipulate and change in real-time, providing incredible interactivity and expression.
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7165 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 11: Envelope Follower

Mastering MONTAGE 11: Envelope Follower
Into percussive arpeggios and drum grooves? This session on the MONTAGE's Envelope Follower is for you!
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5742 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 10: Side Chain Modulation

Mastering MONTAGE 10: Side Chain Modulation
In this lesson, Bad Mister explains the "Side Chain" function of the Motion Control Synthesis Engine which allows for modifying one Part with another. It also extends to the external world as well, because the source PART could be an external input (microphone, guitar, audio device, etc.). This can take several forms and in this session, we'll take a brief look at three of the basic possibilities - including one popular in Electronic Dance Music.
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6617 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 9: Controller Box Switches

Mastering MONTAGE 9: Controller Box Switches
In this lesson, Bad Mister introduces us to to how to leverage the Controller Box Switches.
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6605 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 8: Assignable Knobs

Mastering MONTAGE 8: Assignable Knobs
Bad Mister introduces us to the next lesson in leveraging the power of the MONTAGE - using the Part Assignable Knobs. 
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6200 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 7: Super Knob Value Ranges

Mastering MONTAGE 7: Super Knob Value Ranges
In this next article, learn more about using the MONTAGE Super Knob in setting parameters and limitations for shaping your modulations.
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5771 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 6: Super Knob Complex

Mastering MONTAGE 6: Super Knob Complex
Bad Mister continues to provide indepth insight into MONTAGE's capabilities with this next lesson on the Super Knob.
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6818 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 5: Super Knob Morph

Mastering MONTAGE 5: Super Knob Morph

Your journey into learning more about how to leverage the power of the MONTAGE Super Knob continues in this lesson where you learn about "morphing". 

The articles below are great accompaniments to this article. Check them out:


PERFORMANCE 5: Super Knob Morph A

PERFORMANCE 6: Super Knob Morph B

One of the most important usages of the Super Knob will be morphing (smoothly fading) between two, or more, different Parts. In this example Part 1 is using a Sawtooth wave, while Part 2 is using a Square wave. While Part 1 (Saw) is faded out, Part 2 (Square) is faded in. 

The Sawtooth Wave is bright and buzzy - in includes all whole integer multiples of the Fundamental (all harmonics).
The Square Wave is the perfect case of the Pulse Wave where it is on 50% of the time and off 50% of the time - it is made up of only the odd numbered harmonics (3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, etc.)

Listen closely as you morph from all harmonics (Saw) to just the odd harmonics (Square) and back - slowly turn the Super Knob from minimum-to-maximum and slowly return. You will continue to hear and identify the odd harmonics as you morph the Square Wave back into the Sawtooth. It is as if the Square Wave hides inside the Sawtooth Wave - and indeed by this morphing action we are changing the harmonic content of the sound, but in a very different way than you could do with Filter. A Filter works to remove all harmonics above (LPF) or below (HPF) a center or Cutoff Frequency. Use the second row MUTE buttons to isolate each Part, in turn, to convince yourself that you are actually turning the Saw down as you turn the Square up.

The Assignment
The Controller matrix of the MONTAGE is huge. This is why we are starting slowly. The Super Knob, on the upper Common level of the architecture, can have 16 parameter Destinations (1-16); Additionally, each Part can have its own 16 parameter Destinations. The Super Knob can control its 8 AssignKnobs and each Part has its own 8 AssignKnobs. Let's begin by seeing how the Sawtooth Wave that we hear when we initially recall this sound, is turned down by the Super Knob, and the Square Wave in Part 2, which starts silent, is turned up by a single gesture.

Recall "Super Knob Morph A"
From the HOME screen (touch the Home icon in the upper left corner)
• Highlight the PERFORMANCE NAME: "Super Knob Morph A"
• Press [EDIT]
• Press the [COMMON] button (right side upper COMMON button)
• In the screen select "Control" (left column of the screen) > "Control Assign"
• Make sure the AUTO SELECT option is active (green)
• Move Common Assignable Knob #1 to recall its setting
• Then Common Assignable Knob #2 to recall its setting

Here you can see that Common Assignable Knob 1: Destination 1 = PART 1 Assign 1; Source = AsgnKnob 1
Move Common Assignable Knob 2: Destination 2 = PART 2 Assign 2; Source = AsgnKnob 2

You can view both of these assignments by touching the DISPLAY FILTER and setting it to "ALL" or by moving the "SUPER KNOB" 
The Display Filter simply changes what you are viewing at the current time.

SK as1Morph


Added in version 1.60, as you move the Super Knob with "Auto Select" active, you can review all parameters linked to the Super Knob.
"Destination 1" is the currently selected item (it's blue). Move the cursor to highlight "Destination 2". Highlighting each assignment in turn will allow you to review "how" the controller movement is being applied.

SK as2Morph

After that the assignments in the individual PARTS can be made. You do so by dropping into PART EDIT. Let's view PART 1, first:

• Press the [PART SELECT 1/1] right front panel
• The screen will read "Edit - Part1 - Common"

This will light the lower [COMMON] button for ELEMENT/OPERATOR. If not, it means you were last viewing an individual ELEMENT, press the lower [COMMON] button which is also found in the lower left corner of the screen (blue).
For Part 1 the Common Volume will be reduced using Polarity Bipolar and a negative Ratio, the following settings basically works well. 
• Select "MOD/CONTROL" (left column of the screen) > "Control Assign"

MorphSKa

If you move SUPER KNOB you will see that:
Destination 1 = VOLUME
Source = AsgnKnob 1
Polarity = Bi
Ratio = -64
Param 1 = 5

The Curve graphic shows (reading left to right) the Volume is full and that as you turn up the SUPER KNOB this PART will be turned down in Volume.

Select PART SELECT 2 (button is labeled [PART SELECT 2/2])
• Press the [PART SELECT 2/2] button; or touch where it shows "PART1" in the lower left corner and select "PART2"
• The screen is now: "Edit - Part2- Common"

Now when you move ASSIGN KNOB 2 you will see that: 

MorphPart2a

Destination 1 = VOLUME
Source = AsgnKnob 2
Polarity = Bi
Ratio = +63
Param 1 = 5

The Curve graphic shows (reading left to right) that as you turn up the AssignKnob 2, this PART, which starts at silence, will be turned up in Volume. In the minimum position you will only hear the Saw wave, in the maximum position only Square wave, in the center position a mix of both. These particular examples use the STANDARD Curve Type. This should be easy to follow, to hear and to understand.

Because both the AssignKnob 1 of PART 1 and the AssignKnob 2 of PART 2 are linked to the SUPER KNOB, moving the SUPER KNOB with "Auto Select" active, will show you these same two Controller boxes. And as you move the SUPER KNOB the red indicator for the linked AssignKnob moves with it.
Try that: Move the Super Knob while the Auto Select is (green) active - observe the screen information:
Select [PART 1] move the Super Knob - observe the AssignKnob red indicators.
Select [PART 2] move the Super Knob - observe the AssignKnob red indicators.
Select [COMMON] move the Super Knob - observe the AssignKnob red indicators.

The DISPLAY FILTER will recall what items are going to be changed when the Super Knob is moved. When you are viewing a PART edit screen, this is a quick way to see which parameters are being influenced and by which Controller. Simply highlight the Destination box to review/customize the relationship.
Similarly, when on the upper COMMON/Audio level of the architecture, with the "Auto Select", you can quickly review the PART links to the Super Knob.

As programs get more complex - this is a very important tool. Because as you will see many things can simultaneously be linked to movement of the Super Knob. This Display Filter--Super Knob recall feature, makes it much easier to sort through deeper complex Motion Control programs. For now, just recognize that the Auto Select function helps you *Filter* the data that is recalled to the *Display*. The Display Filter can show everything assigned to a specific SOURCE (Controller).

Recall "Super Knob Morph B"
Basically the same with a few small changes: The Super Knob starts at 127 (fully clockwise) thus starting with the Square Wave, and morphs to the Sawtooth as you move counterclockwise. And the rate of change is different. Let's see what's going on:

From the HOME screen (touch the Home icon in the upper left corner):
• Highlight the PERFORMANCE NAME: "Super Knob Morph B".
• Touch "MOTION CONTROL" in the screen just under "HOME".
• Touch "SUPER KNOB" in the second column.

Here you can see that the SUPER KNOB is stored at a value of 127, effectively reversing its application:
• Touch "OVERVIEW" top of the second column to view the routing scheme.
• Change the "PART" from COMMON to "PART 1" to view the assignments to PART 1.
• Touch the box "Edit PART 1 Control Settings".

This will take you directly to the PART 1 Controller setup... Now you can toggle between PARTs 1 and 2 using the PART SELECT [1/1] and [2/2] buttons on the right front panel.
Try manipulationg the shape of the Curve by highlight "Param 1" and altering the value.
Notice how the application of the controls are being altered by the PARAM 1 setting of "3" (for PART1) versus "7" (for PART2). These determine how fast one PART fades out and the other PART fades in:

Bipolar3 7

By setting PART 1 to the CURVE created by "Param 1 = 3" and setting PART 2 to the CURVE created by "Param 1 = 7" creates a different crossfade - changing how long they overlap...

EXTRA CREDIT:
Let's experiment by checking out using different Curve Types for getting a slightly different morphing process - because PART 1 has a Negative RATIO and PART 2 has the Positive RATIO, you can create these interesting mirror images with the CURVE TYPES:

BellCurve1For example, set the CURVE TYPE = "BELL" shape with opposite positive/negative RATIO settings for the PARTs;

Set PART 1 (Sawtooth) to RATIO = -64 (above)
Set PART 2 (Square) to RATIO = +63 (below)
BellCurve2This allows you to get the Sawtooth wave at the extremes (top graphic) and the Square wave only in the middle (bottom graphic) of the Super Knob travel.



AM Curve1Another example, the "AM" shape with opposite positive/negative RATIO settings, allows you to switch alternately between Saw and Square as you turn the knob from minimum toward maximum
AM Curve2
NOTE:
Navigating back and forth may, at first, seem to be a chore (because you must select the PART and then move the KNOB in order to view what you want) but as you begin to recognize that each PART has its own set of functions the power of this is revealed. Spending time navigating and experimenting here will be well rewarded as you get used to just how deep "scuba diving" with Montage can get! Try to avoid applying AFTERTOUCH while viewing the ASGN KNOB 1/ASGN KNOB 2 with the "AUTO SELECT" option active. This kind of access to parameters and controllers is the equivalent of 'patching' analog synth modules together to make a voltage control sound. This is the first step into the MOTION CONTROL SYSTEM.

Recommended: For example, the STANDARD Curve Type selection would work a bit more smoothly. Set the RATIO = -32 and +32 for the respective Parts 1 and 2, using the Bipolar CURVE TYPE for both. Set the PARAM 1 = 3 for PART 1 and PARAM 1 = 7 for PART 2. This PARAM (will change the CURVE TYPE structure. The graphic gives you a good indication of what is actually happening). Explore the PARAM 1 settings to see how it changes the curve.

At the RATIO'-32' and '+32'; and both set as PARAM 1 = 5, you still get a bit of the PART that fades out when you reach the extremes – instead of silence from the faded PART at the extreme

For Part 1 (fade out of Saw wave) you could use alternately polarity Unipolar with a Ratio of 32, which works especially fine if the Super Knob starts with left position.

If you have any questions or comments about this article, please join us to discuss them on the Forum here.

Catch up on the previous article in the series - "Mastering MONTAGE 4: Super Knob Bipolar" here.

Next article: "Mastering MONTAGE 6: Super Knob Complex" here.

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7374 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 1: The Super Knob

Mastering MONTAGE 1: The Super Knob
Inquiring minds want to know, what's so super about this Super Knob? This series of articles will begin to unfold just what we mean by "Super". The Super Knob is just the first step - the gateway, if you will - into the deeper world of Motion Control Synthesis.
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15742 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 4: Super Knob Bipolar

Mastering MONTAGE 4: Super Knob Bipolar
This lesson takes us into the Super Knob and introduces you further to the concepts of polarity, and more specifically, "Bipolar". 
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6195 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 3: Super Knob Unipolar

Mastering MONTAGE 3: Super Knob Unipolar
Ready to jump into the next lesson about MONTAGE and the Super Knob? 
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7204 Hits

Mastering MONTAGE 2: Super Knob Common

Mastering MONTAGE 2: Super Knob Common
Join us as we continue our series with a look at the Super Knob Common and Performance architecture.

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10248 Hits

Motif to Montage, Part 3

Motif to Montage, Part 3
MOTIF to Montage: Architecture and Interface Differences
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10828 Hits
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