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  1. CassieDennis
  2. Sherlock Holmes
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  4. Friday, 19 June 2020
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Nice simple video, thanks.

One question though, why set the controller to bi polar in this case?
  1. one week ago
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  3. # 1
Bad Mister
Yamaha
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The Polarity (Uni, Bi) can be understood as helping to define how the parameter value will change. If you select UNI (one direction) this means that the parameter’s start value will be both start and end point... say we are using the Curve Type = Standard. A “Uni” setting will allow you start at the current value setting - turning the control will move from the start point to the maximum, and it will return to the start point at minimum when you turn the Knob back to its origin.

Let’s use Volume as an example. Curve Type = Standard, Ratio = a (+) positive number, Polarity = Uni
If the start Volume is 0, then the Knob will increase from 0 toward maximum. And return to 0 when turned back down again.

If the Start Volume is 96, then the Knob will increase from 96 toward maximum. And return to 96 when turned back down again. 96 becomes the minimum. How much is maximum is determined by the “Ratio” setting.

Now let’s consider Volume as the example, but this time Curve Type = Standard, Ratio = a (+) positive number, but Polarity = Bi
This allows the start Volume to be any value and we can increase by turning in one direction and decrease by turning in the opposite direction — thus pivoting both above and below the start value.
If the start Volume was 96, then turning the Knob clockwise front the start point will increase the volume above 96, but because you can now turn the value down below the starting point, going in the opposite direction will cross that 96 starting point, and extend into values below 96. How much above and below the start point is determined by the “Ratio” setting.

Bi directional means you want to start some where in the middle of the parameter range and have an option to increase and decrease from the start point
Uni directional means you want to start and return to the start value. Minimum = start point.

In the case of assigning this to Effect processing. You do not have to always start at 0 (no effect)... Bi means you can start with some Effect and your Assign Knob will allow you to increase or decrease from that start value.

It is illogical to use Bi Directional if the start value is 0 (You cannot turn volume or send level below 0) so Bi where the start value 0 is the same as Uni. You can only really go in one direction and return to your original value.

In the Super Knob Basics article, this concept is gone over in detail... showing how minimum to maximum is fine, but when you know you want to start with some Effect, often you want the option of increase and decreasing from that start value, that is where Polarity = Bi allows change in either direction. The articles use LFO Speed of a Chorus Effect (which goes from 0.00Hz thru 39.7Hz) — if you want the sound to begin with some LFO movement, this system allows you to define a start point, and the direction and amount of movement from the start value. You don’t always want to start with 0 and go all the way to the maximum value.

Extra Credit:
This concept is explained in depth in the following example:
Mastering MODX: Super Knob Common
Mastering MODX: Super Knob UniPolar
Mastering MODX: Super Knob BiPolar
  1. one week ago
  2. MONTAGE
  3. # 2
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Thanks again for taking the time to explain that. While i understand what you are saying (at least i think i do), and understand the two way action of the bi polar curve, could you not just have a normal curve and save the performance with the Superknob at 12 o’clock for example? This still allows you to go lower or higher.

Ill have a read of those articles though, I’m sure I’m missing something obvious, and i can see that if other parts are assigned to the Superknob you need to put more thought in to this.

Dave.
  1. one week ago
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  3. # 3
Bad Mister
Yamaha
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I don’t know if your a Star Trek fan, but original cast “Wrath of Khan”... Khan being a product of the 20th Century got out smarted by James T. Kirk, because as Spock predicted, Khan was accustomed to two dimensional navigation, so Kirk out maneuvered Khan with a Z-plane move.

As you correctly surmise, it can get deeper when more and more parameters are controlled. The Super Knob -> Common Assign Knob -> Part Assign Knob System allows you design extremely detailed changes from a single controller gesture. Moving the Super Knob from the 12 o’clock to the 2 o’clock position, could radically change both Part and individual Element Output across your controlled Parts... and each item being addressed could be designed to respond a specific way, in a different direction, even.

If all the oscillators do the same thing when a controller is moved (as its been forever), we are thinking like Khan (not seeing the bigger picture), by being able to assign so many different Source/Destinations, and being able to design maximums and minimums for each, can give you an entirely different way to approach sound control... and then, we are moving into a different dimension ...
You are about to enter another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind. A journey into a wondrous land of imagination. Next stop...
  1. one week ago
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  3. # 4
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Another reason to use the bi rather than uni is that the values you see on the edit pages are the unmodified values. With bi polar you can thus directly set what the neutral 12 o'clock position should be versus trying to cancel out the value the uni polar curve is adding/subtracting at the 12 o'clock position.
  1. one week ago
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  3. # 5
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
Ok thanks guys, most of that makes it a bit clearer. Ill experiment a bit more with the bi polar settings. So far i dont think ive used it, but i can see how it makes things a bit more versatile.
I was only saying 12 o’clock as an example. So far ive been setting the Superknob by ear, with the intention of tweaking it either way when playing live. I cant see this not working well, but I’m only using this to bring up the volume of a second part. Very simple at the moment. I will experiment with other methods once i need to do more.

As to the first question....Live long and prosper......
  1. one week ago
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  3. # 6
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
While i understand what you are saying (at least i think i do), and understand the two way action of the bi polar curve, could you not just have a normal curve and save the performance with the Superknob at 12 o’clock for example? This still allows you to go lower or higher.


There are several ways to get to the same place. If you know the programmed value for a parameter is 64 - then bipolar would be the easiest way to achieve full range. However, this same parameter you could re-program (change) the value to 0 and then use uni-polar. This would achieve the same result if you set the ratio so Superknob at 12 o'clock adds and offset of 64 to the programmed value.

Thinking of "both ends" of the modulation control is useful - meaning both the programmed value (and fact you can alter this, if you want to realize a result) and the curve including ratio and polarity. Just keep in mind to "refactor" a parameter from bipolar to uni-polar (or vice versa) you need to adjust the programmed value in order to get an equivalent result in terms of the controller gesture and end result.

It just may be easier and more efficient to know that using bipolar you offset by 0 when Superknob is at 12 o'clock vs. trying to arrive at the right offset at 12 o'clock by using a uni-polar curve. Even though using uni-polar could be done after adjusting the programmed value.
  1. 6 days ago
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  3. # 7
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